It takes more than just the latest equipment

March 13, 2011  •  Leave a Comment

This past week I have learned a lot…3 shoots in 2 days, editing over 500+ photos,  I can work 1 handed (Cast #2) & when strobe lights don’t work you make it work with just the modeling lights (as seen in photo below).

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Photography is a form of art, an expression of the photographer (artist) that can convey a deeper meaning even to the simplest of situations. Talented photographers in search of creativity try various options in different genres of photography. Portrait photography, fashion photography, underwater photography, nature photography, etc are some of the limitless options one can specialize in. To be a successful photographer takes more than just the latest equipment. A creative photographer should have an eye for detail and knowledge about lighting. Photography lighting techniques play a very important role in the final output. A subject can be transformed altogether and given different effects simply with the play of light and shadow.

Photography lighting techniques are learned through practice. Professional lighting techniques bring out subtle details. Using light the right way cuts down on unwanted light and dark spots and helps the camera to focus on the subject. If you become familiar with these basic photography lighting techniques, you’ll notice a sharp improvement in your own photos.

The way you use light will change whether you’re taking photos indoors or outdoors. Indoor lighting may be under your control, such as in a studio, or it may be out of your control, such as when you’re at an event like a wedding. If possible, try to turn on all of the lights in an area; this will provide even lighting and reduce the chance that there are shadows in your photos.

You can also take great photographs indoors by using daylight. Try opening all of the curtains in a room and letting the natural light fall on your subjects’ faces. This creates a soft look that is flattering to most people.

Outdoor lighting is always out of your control and it’s often changing. As the sun moves, clouds float by and nighttime falls, you will have to constantly adjust. Sunlight may be considered hard when it’s directly overhead with no obstructions. Hard sunlight produces strong shadows and well-defined bright colors. At the same time, it mutes lighter colors even more, so a pale yellow dress may appear faded or dull in a photograph. On the opposite side, you have soft lighting, which has reverse effects; soft shadows and better-defined background colors.

A lot of photographers keep the sun at their back, called front lighting. This is a good way to avoid glare and make sure you can see your subject in the photograph. It’s not ideal for taking high-quality photographs though. To do that, you want to keep the sun to your side. This is called side lighting. Side lighting will place the shadow on the other side of your subject (away from the camera), making lines appear sharper. Side lighting works exceptionally well in black and white photography, which heavily relies on the distinction between lines.

This is what I learned this week…

 

 



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